NAISA

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Conference

June 13 - 15, 2013

Saskatoon, SK
Canada

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NAISA 2013 Organizers

Robert Innes

Robert Innes (Chair)

Assistant Professor, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Robert is a Plains Cree member of Cowessess First Nation who completed his Phd dissertation, titled "The Importance of Kinship Ties to Members of Cowessess First Nation, at the University of Arizona in the American Indian Studies Program. In January 2007, he was appointed to the position of Assistant Professor in the Department. Prior to his appointment Robert was the Pre-Doctoral Fellow in the American Indian Studies Program at Michigan State University. He completed his M.A. at the University of Saskatchewan in Native Studies - the title of his thesis was "The Socio-Political Influence of the Second World War Saskatchewan Aboriginal Veterans, 1945-1960" -, his B.A. at the University of Toronto with a major in History and a double minor in Aboriginal Studies and English and the Transitional Year Programme at the University of Toronto.

Denise Fuchs

Denise Fuchs

Lecturer, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Denise Fuchs is a lecturer in the Department of Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. She teaches courses related to the history of the First Nations and Metis of Western Canada and is working in partnership with members of the Sandy Bay Cree First Nation on a community-based research and experiential learning project.

Bobby Henry

Bobby Henry

PhD Candidate, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Robert Henry is a Métis who was born and raised in a small rural community outside of Prince Albert, SK. Robert graduated from the Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program in Prince Albert with a Bachelor of Education. Robert later travelled back to New Zealand where he completed his internship training and travelled through the South Pacific before returning back to the University of Saskatchewan to begin work on his Master's of Education from the Indian and Northern Education Program, College of Education. Robert's Master's thesis was titled, Not Just Another Thug: Implications of Defining Youth Gangs in a Prairie City which he successfully defended in the spring of 2009. Currently, Robert is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Native Studies and his areas of interest include gangs and gang theory, youth subcultures, and anti-racist/anti-oppressive theory. Robert also enjoys spending as much free time as possible with his three year old daughter and wife.

Joan Greyeyes

Joan Greyeyes

Special Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Initiatives

University of Saskatchewan

Joan has a background in Education and Education Administration and has received her Bachelor of Education, Diploma in Education Administration, and MA in Education from the University of Saskatchewan. She has many years of experience in corporate and aboriginal relations and has also worked as a consultant in the fields of education, health and governance. She has received many honors and awards for her work and was also the first female President of the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) from 1995-2005.

Michelle Jarvin

Michelle Jarvin

Administrative Assistant, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Michelle has been our Administrative Assistant for 3 years and is a dedicated member of the Native Studies team. She is an active participant (and often organizer) of all departmental events and has been instrumentally helpful in the lead-up to NAISA 2013. She travelled to Connecticut with us in 2012 to help promote the conference and staff our booth at the exhibition. With her help we’re confident you’ll enjoy your time visiting us at the University of Saskatchewan and participating in NAISA 2013.

Deborah Lee

Deborah Lee

Indigenous Studies Liaison Librarian, Murray Library

University of Saskatchewan

Deborah Lee is a Cree and Mohawk librarian. She is currently the Indigenous Studies Liaison and Aboriginal Engagement Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. Prior to this she was responsible for heading the Indigenous Studies Portal team (growing the database to more than 27,000 full-text records), also at the University of Saskatchewan. Deborah was also a Reference Librarian at Library and Archives Canada (formerly the National Library of Canada) in Ottawa for seven years. She has presented widely at local, national and international conferences and published in several peer-reviewed journals, including the Canadian Journal of Native Education, the Journal of Library Administration and Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research.

Ron Laliberte

Ron Laliberte

Assistant Professor, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Ron’s research interests include: Métis issues and history, Aboriginal labour in Western Canada, the history of the sugar beet industry in southern Alberta and, theoretical perspectives on migrant labour forces. He has recently been involved in a collaborative project on First Nations and Métis Identities in Cities (a study of urban Aboriginal communities in Saskatoon). In the near future he hopes to also become involved in doing research on Metis rights in Saskatchewan.

Kathleen Makela

Kathleen Makela

Manager, Aboriginal Students’ Centre

University of Saskatchewan

A descendent of Old Man Beaulieu from the Northwest Territories, Kathleen Makela received a Bachelor of Arts interdisciplinary honors degree with first class distinction in human rights and international law from Saint Thomas University in Fredericton, NB. Following she received her Bachelor of Laws from the University of New Brunswick. From 1993 to 1999, Ms. Makela served as the Law Foundation of Saskatchewan Research Officer with the Native Law Centre of Canada where her portfolios included international Indigenous issues and Aboriginal concepts of justice and healing. In July 1999, Ms. Makela was appointed the Manager of the Aboriginal Students’ Centre (ASC) at the University of Saskatchewan that today serves over 1,500 self-identified Aboriginal students.

Wilna Masuskapoe

Wilna Masuskapoe

Administrative Assistant, First Nation & Métis Advancement, University Advancement

University of Saskatchewan

Wilna Masuskapoe is part of the newly established team within the First Nation & Métis Engagement Offices, University Advancement, University of Saskatchewan, and is currently employed as Clerical Administrative Assistant. With over 20 years of experience, Wilna has served in a variety of roles where she has been a strong advocate of First Nation & Métis issues including employment & organizational capacity development. Wilna obtained a Clerical Assistant Diploma with the Prince Albert Business College and a Certificate in Business Administration with the University of Saskatchewan. Wilna continues to volunteer with various committees with goals of Aboriginal inclusion and improving the lives of the Urban Aboriginal population.

Priscilla Settee

Priscilla Settee

Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Dr. Priscilla Settee is an award winning educator in the Department of Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan and a member of Cumberland House Cree First Nations from northern Saskatchewan.

In 2012 Settee was awarded the Provost Award for teaching excellence in Aboriginal education. Settee’s recent book(Coteau Publishing) Akemeyimow, Indigenous Women’s Stories was published June 2011. Priscilla has established a number of projects locally and internationally, including a CIDA(Canadian International Development Agency) project with the University of San Marcos in Peru. This project supported Indigenous Amazonian and Andean students make the transition from their home communities to the university.

Dr. Settee is a board member for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Canada’s leading progressive think tank and publishing organization, a Faculty Fellow at the Centre for Global Citizenship Education and Research at the University of Alberta and a Research Fellow at the Adivasi Academy in Tejgadh, Gujarat, India.

Signa Daum Shanks

Signa Daum Shanks

Assistant Professor, College of Law

University of Saskatchewan

Signa Daum Shanks is an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Saskatchewan. A Métis who was born and raised in Saskatoon, Signa has enjoyed her time learning how to be a lawyer and historian while working at First Nations University of Canada, the University of Alberta and the University of Saskatchewan. Her current projects include topics such as overlapping land claims by Indigenous groups in Canada, microhistory, Indigenous slavery, and the economic analysis of law. At the College of Law, she teaches torts, Aboriginal Self-Government, Law and Economics and Canadian legal history. Away from the College, she paints, gardens and tries to get more poetry written. Already an avid garage-saler and bingo player, Signa is also trying to learn even more about how to do what her grandmothers used to do in the prairies.

Nancy Van Styvendale

Nancy Van Styvendale

Assistant Professor, Department of English

University of Saskatchewan

Nancy specializes in Native North American literatures and is currently working on a manuscript that explores how recovery and home are represented in Indigenous texts from Canada and the United States. Her upcoming research focuses on the intersections between community service-learning and Aboriginal literatures, specifically in a local context. She serves on the board of AIDS Saskatoon and is one of the central coordinators of the Inspired Minds: All Nations Creative Writing program at the Saskatoon Correctional Centre.

Nancy’s primary research area is Native North American literatures (Indigenous literatures from Canada and the United States). Additional areas of interest include community service-learning; community-engaged learning; community-based research; trauma theory; postcolonial theory; and citizenship in a literary context.

Candace Wasacase-Lafferty

Candace Wasacase-Lafferty

Director of First Nations & Métis Engagement, Office of the Vice President University Advancement

University of Saskatchewan

Candace Wasacase-Lafferty is the newly appointed Director of First Nations and Metis Engagement for the University of Saskatchewan and as such provides leadership in promoting, developing and enhancing the University’s institutional strengths. Through the recent creation of an on reserve office at the English River First Nation Business Center, Candace’s role is to develop the necessary relationships and partnerships to enable the university’s vision. For the last ten years Candace has lead the University’s Aboriginal Employment Strategy where she focused on creating a culturally respectful environments through work place education and worked diligently to address accessibility issues. Candace grew up on the Kahkewistahaw First Nation and moved to Saskatoon to study at the U of S where she pursued her Bachelor of Arts Degree . Her career spans 15 years and has held positions with the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations and the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies. As an active community volunteer, Candace is currently on the Board of Directors for Wanuskewin Heritage Park and former Vice Chair of Inter-Provincial Association on Native Employment (IANE) Saskatoon.

Winona Wheeler

Winona Wheeler (Department Head)

Associate Professor, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

Winona is a member of the Fisher River Cree Nation in Treaty No. 5 territory (Manitoba) though her family hails from George Gordon’s First Nation in Treaty No. 4 territory (Saskatchewan). Of Cree/Assiniboine/Saulteaux and English/Irish descent Winona has been a professional historian and a professor of Indigenous Studies since 1988.

Allison Piche

Allison Piché

Conference Coordinator
M.A. Candidate, Department of Native Studies

University of Saskatchewan

E-mail me with your questions at: naisa.2013@usask.ca

Allison is a Master’s candidate and Sessional Instructor in the department of Native Studies. Her research examines the impact of culturally relevant arts and education programming in prison, focusing on Aboriginal overrepresentation in Canadian Corrections. She co-facilitates the Inspired Minds: All Nations Creative Writing Program at Saskatoon Correctional Centre.

Carrie Gates

Carrie Gates

Web design

eMAP, University of Saskatchewan

www.emap.usask.ca
carrie.gates@usask.ca

Carrie Gates is a digital media designer who created the look and feel of this year's NAISA conference website. She works at Media Access and Production (eMAP) at the University of Saskatchewan and earned her undergraduate degree in Art History at the university as well. Carrie is passionate about using best practices in contemporary design, information architecture, and usability research to create attractive, interactive, digital media solutions. Carrie believes that good design is more like architectural problem solving than decoration, and it is always the needs of the people using a tool that should drive the functionality and aesthetics.

David Brown

David Brown

Programmer

eMAP, University of Saskatchewan

www.emap.usask.ca
david.brown@usask.ca

David is a developer with Media Access and Production (eMAP) at the University of Saskatchewan and is responsible for the front end development of NAISA 2013 conference website. David received an undergraduate degree in Computer Science in 2010 from the University of Saskatchewan.


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